FREE STANDARD SHIPPING ON ALL ORDERS
0 Cart
Added to Cart
    You have items in your cart
    You have 1 item in your cart
    Total

    Natracure Blog — Winter

    Blog Menu

    Got Cabin Fever? You Need These 8 Rules for Exercising Outside all Winter Long

    Baby, it's cold outside...so you better just stay inside, bundled up, and skip your workout right? Wrong! It is possible to exercise outside, all year long! We've rounded up some tips to help you stay fit through these cold winter months and a few occasions when you should stay inside instead. 1. WARM-UPS ARE A MUST A proper warm-up is the precursor to any quality workout but it is more important than ever when you workout outdoors in cool or cold conditions. 'Always start with a warm up! Don't skip it because you are cold and want to jump into your workout,' says Erin Houg, owner of FIT4MOM Eastside in Redmond, Washington. Sprains, strains, and tears are much more likely in a body that hasn't warmed up, so before you jump into your workout, spend a few minutes to loosen up. Houg recommends utilizing large muscle groups first because it will warm up your body faster and is a good practice for avoiding an injury, whether you're working out indoors or out. Get toasty fast with these tricks to making your body feel warmer. 2. TAKE TIME TO REFLECT The winter not only brings the cold, it also brings shorter days and more morning and evening darkness. 'If you're working out closer to dusk or dawn, reflective gear is a must,' says Nichole Malkiel, holistic health coach and group fitness Instructor at Shape Your Being LLC based in Fairfield, Connecticut. You should also be extra aware of your surroundings and watching for cars and traffic while exercising outdoors, she suggests. 3. LAYERS ARE YOUR FRIEND 'I rely heavily on layers, which are easy to shed if you get too warm,' says Malkiel. But you always want to cover your head, ears, fingers, and toes as they tend to get cold quickly, she adds. Learn how to layer the smart way. 4. WATCH THE WIND CHILL FACTOR 'It's important to take into consideration not only air temperatures but also wind chill factor,' says Malkiel. Although frostbite isn't likely to occur in temperatures above 5 degrees Fahrenheit, according to the Mayo Clinic, the risk increases greatly with higher winds or rain. 'If the temperature is hovering around freezing and the wind is over five miles per hour, I bring my classes in,' she says. Find out the other surprising ways your body deals with freezing temps. 5. SLATHER ON THE SUNSCREEN Yes, even in the winter. Skin is exposed to sun and UV rays during all daylight hours, even when it's cloudy and cold. If you've ever seen a friend post-ski vacation with an awkward sunburn, you know that sun damage doesn't only happen in the summer. Snow is highly reflective, so slather on a sweat-proof sunscreen with UVA and UVB protection, anytime you head outdoors to exercise. Find out other sunscreen mistakes to avoid. 6. WATCH OUT FOR FALLS Malkiel says that when the ground is icy or snowy, the risks of working out outdoors become greater than the benefits. 'Although we enjoy being outside as much as possible, it's far too easy to get injured on snow or ice,' she says. Since slips and falls are way more common in colder months and especially in poor footwear, make sure to wear quality shoes with good traction for any outdoor workouts, regardless of weather conditions. 7. ADDRESS ASTHMA 'Check with your doctor if you have preexisting conditions such as asthma,' says Malkiel since, according to the AAAAI (American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology), both exercise and cold, dry weather can exacerbate or trigger asthma symptoms. That's because the nose usually warms and moistens air for the lungs but, during intense exercise, mouth breathing is more common. As a result cold and dry air has more direct access to the lungs. (These are clear signs you have exercise-induced asthma.) 8. SHAKE OFF THE RAIN Unless temperatures are too low, working out in the rain is completely doable, with water-resistant gear. 'There is something about the fresh air and being in Washington state where we get a lot of rain—it is the nature of our area,' says Houg. 'We learn to deal with it rather than avoid it. One of our mottos at FIT4MOM is 'We train in the rain and we mean it!'' (Though class is canceled during a thunderstorm.) By Anne Fritz via MSN Health

    10 Cheap Ways to Keep Skin Healthy This Winter

    Winter weather isn't just chilly -- it's often downright arid. The harsh weather conditions and low humidity can strip skin of moisture, rendering it dry, scaly, and itchy. Resist the urge to reach for pricey creams and serums, though, and instead heed these tips to soothe skin on the cheap for the rest of the season. BUNDLE UP Dry skin and chapped lips are often the result of prolonged exposure to a cold, dry environment. When temperatures dip and the wind picks up, gloves, scarves, and even sunglasses protect against freezing, dry air. If you have sensitive skin, try to wear only smooth, natural fibers and avoid potentially irritating fabrics such as wool near the face. HUMIDIFY THE HOME As the temperature drops, humidity tends to do the same, and the dry air leeches moisture from skin. Indoor heat sources only make matters worse, so set the thermostat as low as you can bear and use a humidifier in the rooms where you spend the most time. A good cheap humidifier might cost $50 or so but should last far longer than a jar of lotion. An even cheaper alternative: Simply place bowls of water around the home. The water will slowly evaporate and add moisture to the air. Houseplants with large leaves also boost the moisture level around them. WASH WITH CARE The body produces oils to lubricate skin and prevent over-drying, but overzealous washing strips away those oils. Limit yourself to one short bath or shower a day, using mild soap. When washing your face, avoid astringents and cleansers that contain alcohol unless you have acne-prone skin. Although hot water may appeal on a cold morning, dermatologists suggest bathing in warm or cool water instead. USE SOAP-FREE BODY AND FACE WASH Lathering up in the shower may seem like the best way to get clean, but the sodium lauryl sulfate in many face and body washes is known to irritate and strip skin of moisture. Cleansers marketed as "soap-free" or "sulfate-free" could relieve excessively dry skin. MAXIMIZE MOISTURE Apply lotion immediately after washing hands or stepping out of the shower to lock in moisture. It also helps to keep the bathroom door closed to maintain high humidity while applying lotion or cream. Pay particular attention to vulnerable body parts such as hands, feet, elbows, and knees. Make moisturizer more effective by exfoliating skin every week to get rid of dead cells that sit on the top layer of the skin, making it flaky and rough. MAKE YOUR OWN MOISTURIZER Many homemade moisturizer recipes call for ingredients that may already be in the kitchen and promise savings over store-bought creams. Search sites such as Pinterest for a DIY skin-care regimen. If you'd rather buy cheap moisturizer than make it, a key ingredient to look for is glycerin, which attracts and locks in moisture. TRY AN OIL Healthy oils serve a variety of purposes but have one unique, cheap benefit: They are excellent skin moisturizers. While olive oil is one of the most popular, grapeseed, avocado, and sweet almond oil are regularly praised for their moisture-locking properties. Like lotions and cream-based moisturizers, oils work best when applied to damp skin, preferably after showering. RESIST LIP LICKING The body's natural instinct to relieve dry lips is to lick them. However convenient, repeated licking only dries out lips even more. The acids and enzymes in saliva actually cause the moisture already on the lips to evaporate. Instead, keep handy a lip balm that doesn't contain menthol or camphor, two drying agents. MOISTURIZE FROM WITHIN Like lotions and oils that go on the body, what goes in the body affects how the skin appears. Winter is the ideal time to consume foods such as olive oil, which contains a compound called squalene that protects the skin from ultraviolet rays and moisture loss.Salmon, almonds, and sweet potatoes are other foods recommended by beauty experts to nourish and replenish moisture in the skin. DON'T FORGET SPF The sun can be insidious in the winter, as people who slather themselves in sunscreen all summer let their guard down once it gets cold. UV rays can still cause damage, so protect skin by choosing a moisturizer and lip balm with sun protection factor, or SPF. By Tahirah Blanding via MSN Health